485 Madison Avenue

New York, NY 10022

T: 212-658-1122

steven.glickel@nyumc.org

Biography Philosophy

Biography

Steven Z. Glickel, M.D. is a renowned hand surgeon who was President of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand in 2007-2008. For 2 decades, he was the Director of Hand Surgery at St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Center, the Director of The C.V. Starr Hand Surgery Center and Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Columbia University. In February 2016 he changed his affiliation to New York University-Hospital for Joint Disease, was appointed Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at NYU and moved his office to the Roosevelt Hand to Shoulder at OrthoManhattan. Dr. Glickel was born and raised in New York City. He received his Doctor of Medicine degree from Harvard Medical School after which he did an internship and residency in General Surgery at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. He completed a residency in Orthopedic Surgery at the Harvard Combined Orthopedic Program which included the Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital. After residency, he returned to New York and did a Research Fellowship in Microsurgery at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center followed by a Fellowship in Hand and Reconstructive Surgery at St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Center with J. William Littler, M.D. and Richard G. Eaton, M.D.. He joined the staff at St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Center in 1984 and has remained there since. In 2007-2008, Dr. Glickel was President of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, the leading specialty society devoted to surgery of the hand and upper extremity in the world. He was also a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Foundation for Surgery of the Hand and has been President of the New York Society for Surgery of the Hand. In 2014, he was elected to be Vice-Chairman of the American Foundation for Surgery of the Hand. Dr. Glickel has been listed in the New York Magazine Best Doctors in New York every year since 1996, America’s Top Doctors yearly since2001, Best Doctors in America since 2002, Best Surgeons in America since 2005 and New York Times Super Doctors since 2010. His practice is devoted to surgery of the hand, wrist, forearm, and elbow with a particular interest in reconstructive surgery, trauma, nerve compression, elbow surgery and sports injuries. Dr. Glickel has contributed extensively to the literature in hand and orthopedic surgery and is a frequent lecturer and visiting professor at other Medical Centers. Most recently, he was the Invited Speaker of the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand, the Edward Nalebuff Professor at the New England Baptist Hospital and the Richard J. Smith Lecturer at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, the Distinguished Visiting Professor, Paul Lipscomb Lectureship at the University of California, Davis and Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland.

Practice Philosophy

My practice philosophy is to treat all patients as I would want members of my family treated. I carefully listen to the patient’s history of both the problem for which he or she is being seen as well as their past medical history. I do a meticulous examination of the affected hand, wrist, elbow and/or shoulder. Once I formulate a diagnosis, I consider all of the treatment options. Although I am a surgeon, the majority of patients that I see have problems that are amenable to non operative treatment which includes therapy, splints, exercise and medication. Some problems do not respond to conservative treatment and require surgery. For those problems I bring nearly 30 years of experience to the operating room to perform the simplest and most specific procedure possible to correct the problem. Postoperative care and rehabilitation often involves certified hand and physical therapists who share our offices and have vast experience providing compassionate, expert care designed to optimize the result of surgery. Our goal is to restore function and return patients to their lives and activities as rapidly as possible.